Tag Archive: Hawaiian

Podcast 24: Mildred Bailey to Jay Wilber and Ukelele Ike

Music and song from the years between the two World Wars. As always we steer away from the big names. Claude Hopkins starts us off with Washington Shuffle. He was born in Virginia and was a talented stride piano player and arranger. In 1925 he went to Europe as the musical director of The Revue Negre. Josephine Baker was a performer in that Revue. Next Cliff Edwards, Ukelele Ike, the voice of Jiminy Cricket and friend to Buster Keaton. Then we have Hawaiiian music from Frank Ferrara followed by three on the Zonophone label- International Novelty Quarette, Bud Billings and Carson Robinson and Esther Coleman. Next we have the extrememly pukka Uncle Mac, BBC Radio children’s presenter with some nursery rhymes. Early jazz follows from Jasper Taylor’s State Street Boys, 1926 and from the same year The Vernons sing the very understanding ‘I don’t care what you used to be.’ Two from the prolific Jay Wilber, one under his name, the other under The Connecticut Collegians. Harry Reser, another prolific band leader, under the name The Clevelanders. From the north east of Scotland the tongue twisting ‘McGinty’s Meal and Ale’. Sing along if you can!! We finish with Mildred Bailey, The Queen of Swing from 1938 with ‘As long as you live you’ll be dead when you die.’ If you want to put faces to some of the artists I play, check out the Forgotten Songs playlist here.

published on May 11, 2020, by

Podcast 17: Paul Small, Hal Kemp to Dinah Shore and Hutch (bonus)

A bonus episode as we begin this strange time in semi lock down in Edinburgh and around the world. Recorded last year. I bill it as an episode with jolly music back then – perfect for these extarordinary times. Stay safe. We have Tennessee Ernie and Sixteen Ton- yes I need a better copy of this much played 78. Paul Small Orch on a Diva label, produced for WT Grant store in the US from 1925 to 32. Layton and Johnson, Leslie (Hutch) Hutchinson, Dinah Shore, Hal Kemp- sadly died young in a car crash. Claude Hopkins, Lucky Millinder. Frank Ferrara with some spaced out Hawaiian music. They say between 1915 to 1930 Ferrara produced a quarter of all Hawaiian records. More up to date from the late 1950s Australian singer Jimmy Parkinson. We finish with a couple from Harry Parry.

published on March 27, 2020, by