Tag Archive: Eartha Kitt

Podcast 42: From Mugsy and Fats to Kitty, Kay and Jean Farrar

Tennessee Ernie with Smokey Mountain Boogie start us off. Thrillingly it’s a shout out to the daughter and niece of the Kendrick Brothers- Bob Skyles and his Skyrockets- when I play their track, I’m gonna die with a broken heart. Jean Goldkette Orchestra with My pretty girl stomp and Harry Roy with You and I. Vocals on that are by Jean Farrar. Over the top piano from Carmen Cavallaro, Enlloro. Female vocalists next up. Kitty Kallen, who made a very successful transition from big band singer to a solo career. Kay Starr, who successfully sang Pop, Country and Jazz. Both women had long careers and lives, dying at 94. Les Paul with Mary Ford on multi track vocals and Eartha Kitt singing in Turkish. Jazzy blues from Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats (Tin Roof Blues) Mugsy Spanier (Hestitating Blues) Fats Waller (Shortin’ Bread) and Jelly Roll Morton (Oh didn’t he ramble). We end with Lonnie Donegan, I’m just a rolling stone. Another great travelling song. Hal McIntyre, who sadly died young, brings episode 42 to a close with the trippy South Bayou Shuffle.

published on September 30, 2020, by

Podcast 39: Some naughtiness and the cynical side of love

Some old favourites and an episode not without a few double entendres. That cheeky fellow George Formby starts us off in his little Wigan garden. I don’t think it’s all about plants and insects though. Fats Waller extolls the virtues of rump steak. Tennessee Ernie Ford sings ‘kiss me big!’ We get all cynical with Marlene Dietrich and Rosemary and ‘Too old to cut the mustard’ and two magnificent tracks from Eartha Kitt. Lonnie Donegan gives a fine vocal performance in ‘Love is strange.’ The Kendrick brothers and pals, aka Bob Skyles and his Skyrockets sing ‘Lets play love’ and Teresa Brewer ‘Wang , Wang blues’. Marvellous. The antidote to soppy love songs completes the show ‘ Love song in 32 bars.’ A short but sweet one.. or is it bitter in parts?

published on September 2, 2020, by

Podcast 19: Mary Ford to Hot Lips Page

Yes I start with Eartha again. I’ve no shame! Couple of Western Swing tracks, Light Crust Dough Boys, billed as a hot string band and Bob Skyles and his Skyrockets from 1937. Dinah Shore, Les Paul and Mary Ford, Harry Parry, Hal McIntyre, Leslie (Hutch) Hutchinson and Fats Waller. Early Jazz from Friar Society Orchestra from around 1922. Mead Lux Lewis and a 1935 recording of ‘Honky Tonk Train Blues’. Red Nelson on the Brunswick Sepia Series label and more trains with ‘Stream Line Train.’ Nelson is looked upon as one of the pioneers of R&B. Two brilliant tracks from The Hot Lips Page Trio. The rather bitter lament, ‘Just Another Woman.’ Then as an antidote ‘My Fightin’ Gal.’ What a woman she is.  There’s more of course.

published on April 8, 2020, by

Podcast 18

Its not all 78s this time round. Two vinyl pieces of magic from Eatha Kitt from the splendid 1956 LP, ‘That bad Eartha.’ Freddy Randall, part of the post war trad jazz revival in Britain. Illinois Jacquet and his honking and screeching sax. Light classics from Bill Snyder, actually its rather good and laid back ‘Chicago Blue.’ Roy Fox and his band from 1934. Very brief vocals for Al Bowlly. A cheesey three, notable for the Walter Huston’s September Song. Raymond Dance, Hal McIntyre and the banjo of Len Fillis from 1928. Record of the episode the rather naughty and suggestive Tiny Bradshaw. There’s more of course.

published on April 1, 2020, by

Episode 11

Rock Island Line the song that originated in the USA and came over to UK to be sung by Lonnie Donegan. We have a 45rpm sneaking in. A local song, not even Edinburgh, it’s Leith and from the 1980s, it’s certainly forgotten and it’s a mystery artist- J Sutcliffe. Wingy Manone and Mugsy Spanier. Great names, great tracks. Two from Eartha and one from Patti Page. On a bit of a toe curling note, Matty O’Neil sings ‘Don’t sell daddy anymore whiskey.’ A baby cries all the way through it! ‘Just wee deoch an’ doris,’ in Scots and celebrating the more cheery side of a wee dram. That’s from 1912. Sugar Chile Robinson. A child star that sang to two US presidents, 70 years apart. There’s more of course.

published on March 7, 2020, by

Episode 10

Bit of a naughty with start C’est si bon and Eartha. Fats Waller celebrates Rump Steak in a serenade. Harlan Lattimore and his spaced out ‘Chant of the weeds.’ Wonder what that’s about? Lucky Thompson, jazz sax pioneer, puts in an appearance and then it all goes down and dirty again with Red Ingle spitting out his Chew tobacco rag. Talking of dirty. Arthur (Guitar boogie) Smith plays Express Train Boogie. His ‘Feuding Banjos’ was adapted as ‘Duelling Banjos’ in the film Deliverance. Uncredited he took the film producers to court and won. Having seen the film he was disgusted with the content and wanted nothing to do with it. Still at least he got some money. Also The Star gazers with ‘I see the moon.’ Its in sane and was No1 in 1959. We finish with Artie Shaw. There are others too.

published on March 2, 2020, by

Episode 8

Heavens we start off with some 45rpms. The German, well Austrian, Freddy Quinn. Huge selling star in Germany in the 1950s and 60s. He’s going all South Seas and Elvis like. French star Sacha Distel also sings in German – not sure how successfully! Jean Campbell on an Embassy records’ Woolworth’s own brand. Jean was very much a jobbing singer. Its her voice in the TV adverts for Beanz Meanz Heinz in the 1960s. Also Eartha Kitt and Oggere from the 1956 album Thursday’s Child. Lush orchestration from Henri Rene. Early country from Al Dexter. Also Dinah Shore, Bob Crosby, Lionel Hampton and Frankie Laine.

published on March 2, 2020, by