Tag Archive: Bob Crosby

Podcast 42: From Mugsy and Fats to Kitty, Kay and Jean Farrar

Tennessee Ernie with Smokey Mountain Boogie start us off. Thrillingly it’s a shout out to the daughter and niece of the Kendrick Brothers- Bob Skyles and his Skyrockets- when I play their track, I’m gonna die with a broken heart. Jean Goldkette Orchestra with My pretty girl stomp and Harry Roy with You and I. Vocals on that are by Jean Farrar. Over the top piano from Carmen Cavallaro, Enlloro. Female vocalists next up. Kitty Kallen, who made a very successful transition from big band singer to a solo career. Kay Starr, who successfully sang Pop, Country and Jazz. Both women had long careers and lives, dying at 94. Les Paul with Mary Ford on multi track vocals and Eartha Kitt singing in Turkish. Jazzy blues from Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats (Tin Roof Blues) Mugsy Spanier (Hestitating Blues) Fats Waller (Shortin’ Bread) and Jelly Roll Morton (Oh didn’t he ramble). We end with Lonnie Donegan, I’m just a rolling stone. Another great travelling song. Hal McIntyre, who sadly died young, brings episode 42 to a close with the trippy South Bayou Shuffle.

published on September 30, 2020, by

Podcast 40: Danish folk music to a Gujarati film song

It’s a right old mix this time round. We start with the familiar and Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats from 1937. Then four from the 1920s. Hal Kemp, the purveyor of ‘soothing, sweet dance music,’ 1928. He sadly died at the age of 36. The Sunshine Boys from 1929. They were brothers Joe and Dan Mooney and they only recorded between 1929 and 1931. The Savoy (Hotel) Havana Band, led by Bert Ralton from 1923 and from1929 Ray Starita and his Ambassador Orchestra. Vocals by Betty Bolton. Bolton was an all round entertainer, actor, singer and a childhood star in World War One. She died at the age of 99 in 2005. Forgotten Songs is all about variety. So up next is Danish Folk Dance and Gujarati film music from 1950. The Barmy Brothers sing ‘Puss, Puss, Puss,’ 1933. Could find nothing out about them. Neither could I about Kirk Stevens and his very 1950s rendition of Forevermore. Emile Vacher was certainly well known. Deemed the creator of ‘Bas Musette.’ Very French accordion music. We go out with two Mugsy Spanier tracks- ‘At the jazz band ball’ and Lonesome Road. Both from 1939. Great and a great trumpet player.

published on September 9, 2020, by

Podcast 36: Forgotten Songs – what’s it all about?

A short one this time round. Some snippets of some old favourites: Roberto Inglez, Leslie (Hutch) Hutchinson, Bob Crosby, Lorrae Desmond, Bob Skyles, Jimmie Rodgers, Billy Williams, Harry Torrani and Teresa Brewer. Its mainly a wee chat about what the programme is all about and why I select the records I play. If you’d like to get in touch I can be emailed at milestubb@gmail.com

published on August 12, 2020, by

Podcast 35: Bob Crosby to Patti Page and George Price

Bob is back, three from him. Lovely 30s music and vocals ‘On a steamer coming over,’ 1933, from Billy Cotton. Eleven times married Charlie Barnet with another mode of transport ‘Sky liner.’ Think we need a new copy of that record!  Also up The Dixie Marimba Players, The Casa Loma Orchestra, The Deep River Boys,  Eddie Condon and Joe ‘Fingers’ Carr, who was in fact Lou Busch. The intriguing singer Billy Banks. Primarily known as a female impersonator on record- sounding male here with the jazz standard ‘Margie.’ Our oldest record is by GH Ghirgwin, ‘Asleep in the Deep,’ from 1912. Chirgwin act was ‘black face.’ An oddly popular style of entertainment until the 1970s. Remember the BBC series The Black and White Minstrel show?  I don’t usually play the genre but Chirgwin’s vocal performance is a straight one and his story is interesting. As is George Price. Performing at the age of six he impressed the mighty Caruso.  His stardom was brought to an abrupt halt when he fell out with Jacob Schubert, the theatre magnet. He did return to entertainment though and he shows a strong, unusual voice.  Patti Page sings about Johnny Guitar, ‘My restless lover.  Its another naughty ending with Ozzie Nelson and ‘The man who come around’. 

published on August 5, 2020, by

Podcast 16

Melvin Jerome Blanc, the man of a thousands voices- Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Barney Rubble and Bugs. So many Looney Tunes favourites. Three from Bob Crosby, including a Shakespearian sonnet. Les Compagnons De La Chanson and The Three Bells. Lovely Gallic harmony. A ‘B’ side, In the Light of the Silvery Moon but what is the big hit on the other side? Nat King Cole and The Four Knights, more Winifred Atwell, Georgia Gibbs, Jean Goldkette and Gary Miller, the singing voice of Troy Tempest in Stingray. A pioneering Rock and Roll star, who last year was touring Britain at the age of 82, Charlie Gracie. Early country and Western Swing from The Hill Billies and Hoosiers Hot Shots. Two songs in Scots. The pre 1st World War, ‘We’ll hae just Anither.’ Its from Hector Gordon, he’s a bit of a mystery. More up to date and no mystery Joe Gordon and The Folk Four, A regular in The White Heather Club on TV in the 60s. In amongst all this the magnificent Harry Parry (pictured) and his Radio Rhyhm Sextet, vocals by Doreen Villiers. What a title ‘ Bounch me, brother, with a solid four.’

published on March 25, 2020, by

Episode 14

William Hannah (pictured) was the top Scottish accordian player in the 1920s and 30s and the rider of fast motorbikes. We have Georgia Gibb, Dorothy Squire and a Capitol, single sided promotional record from June Christy, ‘Not I.’ Its a cracker. A couple of Woolworth’s own brand labels Elipse and Embassy. Both evocative of their times. In the same vein Columbia’s own house band, The Denza Dance Band. Some pure cheese from The Hill Billies and Old Faithful. Its a raucous start with a Bill Haley ‘B’ side and Bob Crosby and his Bob Cats. Andy Kirk and his Clouds of Joy are Scratching in the Dust. Great band name and song title. It was written by Mary Lou William. Mentor and friend to such greats as Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespsie and Thelonius Monk. There’s more of course.

published on March 8, 2020, by

Episode 9

Fats Waller bewailing those big feet. The Tanner Sisters sell their toffee apples. They were a support act for Buddy Holly when he toured Britain. Stella went on to a successful career as an actor. The special effects dept have a ball with Ernest Butcher’s ‘Peaceful Street.’ The poor man can get no sleep for the sound of street vendors, road works, horses, factory sirens. All the sounds of a 1930s street. Hal McIntyre with KiIlle Killie, vocals by the Four Lyttle Sisters- their real family name was Gourley! We also have Burl Ives, Blue Baron, Les Paul and Bob Crosby does Shakespeare. Jazz to shakespearean sonnets. It works too. Way back in time we have Tom Foy from 1913, singing about a mill girl.

published on March 2, 2020, by

Episode 8

Heavens we start off with some 45rpms. The German, well Austrian, Freddy Quinn. Huge selling star in Germany in the 1950s and 60s. He’s going all South Seas and Elvis like. French star Sacha Distel also sings in German – not sure how successfully! Jean Campbell on an Embassy records’ Woolworth’s own brand. Jean was very much a jobbing singer. Its her voice in the TV adverts for Beanz Meanz Heinz in the 1960s. Also Eartha Kitt and Oggere from the 1956 album Thursday’s Child. Lush orchestration from Henri Rene. Early country from Al Dexter. Also Dinah Shore, Bob Crosby, Lionel Hampton and Frankie Laine.

published on March 2, 2020, by