Tag Archive: blues

Podcast 37: Red Nelson via Fletcher Henderson and Nancy Whisky

Its an imaginary train journey on my part. West to east across the USA, from San Francisco to Hagerstown in Washington County and this is some music to accompany the journey. Two Choo, choo songs to start: The Merry Macs with Choo Choo Polka and a crazy track from Winifred Atwell, Choo Choo Samba. A double sided train record from Michael Holliday, 10 Thousand Miles and The Run Away Train. Remember the latter from Junior Choice, a BBC radio children’s show in the 1960s. Hutch sings Over the hill. Okay its not about trains but you’ll understand the reason and it is Hutch! Trains in the title or train type music: Honky Tonk Train- Meade Lux Lewis (1935 recording), Munson Street Breakdown- Lionel Hampton, PDQ Blues- Fletcher Henderson and Red Nelson- Streamline Train. We take a break from the dusty travel to clean up. So its The Rhythm Maniacs and Singing in the bath tub. Back on the train and Sleepy Town Train from the Milt Herth Trio, some early Hammond Organ from 1942. George Chisholm next and another non train song but the title says it all- Lets go! Freight Train, Chas McDevitt and Nancy, excellent track and big hit from 1962. Wrongly credited and copyrighted to Williams and James for many years. It was in fact written by Elizabeth Cotton, around 1908. My favourite of the day, When the sun goes down. Lonnie Donegan at his best. Billed as Skiffle, it’s blues though. We finish with Ted Heath and his music and Grand Central Station. It’s not even about the station or trains!

published on August 19, 2020, by

Podcast 29: The Blues, Boogie and Jazz

Another more music, less chat episode. Ten 78rpm records from 1927 to 1951. Two from Tiny Rowland- Bradshaw Boogie and Walkin’ the chalk line. Cootie Williams – Blues in my condtion, Hot Lips Page – My fightin’ gal, Red Nelson – Streamline train, Mead Lux Lewis – Honky tonk train, Bessie Smith – Muddy waters, Fletcher Henderson – PDQ Blues, Jimmy Yancy – East St Louis blues and Mildred Bailey – So help me.

published on June 20, 2020, by

Podcast 26: Tom Foy to Ruth Etting and Roberto Inglez

We open with the greatest love song ever written! Two oldies, Tom Foy, born 1879 and Stanley Kirkby, born 1878. Both men were from the north of England and performed in Music Hall. Sadly Foy died in 1917. His, ‘If we live to be ninety nine’ is the oldest record I have played so far, 1911. I still find it hard to comprehend we can listen to a record that is 109 years old! Kirkby was the most prolific recording artist of his time and around 1918 he is estimated to have been earning over £26000 a week, in modern terms. Also playing, close harmony group The Merry Macs, Vicky Young, the magnificent Hoagy Carmichael, Ray Martin Orchestra, Josh White, Ruth Etting, from 1929 and child star, the boogie woogie piano playing, Sugar Chile Robinson. Johnny Dennis and his Ranchers, English cowboy music and whistling. Love it. Its the nearest thing we have to Western Swing. Couple of blues numbers- pared back, Gin MIll blues from Joe Sullivan and his piano and a little more modern with Vido Musso. My record of the day is Roberto Inglez with Los Celos Y El Viento. Latin American from the man born Robert Maxtone Ingles in Elgin in the North East of Scotland. His is an intriguing story to say the least.

published on May 25, 2020, by