Tag Archive: 1900s

Podcast 34: Enrico Caruso from 1908 to Charles Penrose in 1922

In the studio my guest is a Decca XL Portable wind up record player. So many of these lovely machines were taken to the front in world War One that they were known as the ‘Trench gramophone.’ ‘Mic’d’ up it plays us three records. It needs a bit of TLC. You will hear me mention its running a little fast. I’ve made adjustments in editing, hopefully sounds better. Via the Decca we have Enrico Caruso singing Lolita, from 1908. He was one of the first big recording stars of the 20th century. Mr Evan Williams, born in the US of Welsh parents, he had a successful career both sides of the Atlantic. Sadly we don’t get a lot of his version of My Ain Folk(1914). Lastly, Scottish Superstar Harry Lauder with ‘Ta ta my bonnie Maggie Darling(1914). The interloper is a 1934 Eclipse record from Master Wilfred Eaton but it is called ‘Songs from long ago.’ Master Wilfred also sang under the name Master Joe Petersen. Such a vogue for boy sopranos in the 1930s. When a record company (Rex?) decided they wanted some of the action they employed Mary O’Rourke to masquerade as their boy soprano. Mary was still performing as Joe when she was 50. Otherwise we have Charles Penrose singing one of ‘laughing’ song (1922), Miss Elsie Southgate and her sister Dorothy (1915), perform ‘Ave Maria.’ George Robey sings the very cheeky ‘And that’s that’ in 1915. In the comic monologue towards the end of the record he mentions the humiliation of having go into the studio to shout into a pipe to record the song! Lastly from 1913 Billy Williams. Another big music hall star, born in Australia, he gives us the rather saucy ‘The worst of it is I like it.’

published on July 29, 2020, by

Podcast 33: British bands and BBC radio stars from the 1920s & 30s

Some records from the back of the forgotten Songs shelves! The Happy Wanderer and my mash up pronouncing Oberkirkchen starts us off. Hopefully the tune doesn’t remain in your head for the rest of the day! Five bands/ big band records in a row. Ambrose, Frankie Carle, two from Lew Stone (vocals by Nat Gonella and an uncredited Al Bowlly,) from the Tower Blackpool Bertini and his band and Percival Mackay. What a back story he has. George Cates plays ‘Nightfall and Mayer Gordon some San Saene. Three singers who were on various BBC Scottish radio stations in the 1920s and 30s: Neil Mclean, Ian Ferguson and Alex MacGregor.  Irving Gillette sings the Sankey hymn, ‘There were ninety and nine.’ Its a 1909 recording. Gillette’s real name was Harry Haley McClasky , he sang under numerous different names. Also up Teddy Johnson, Phil Cardrew and his Corn huskers and Jimmy Lurchford. Lester Ferguson sings us out with the lullaby ‘Sleepy Eyes.’ So all that remains for me to say is ‘goodnight.’

published on July 22, 2020, by