A three record special for Valentines day

Three romantic favourites at Forgotten Songs. Frankie Froba was an American jazz pianist, active from the 1920s until the 50s. Here he plays with the Jimmy Atkins Trio.  Always makes me chuckle- Love song in 34 bars. We get properly soppy with our other two tracks. Nat King Cole with My Flaming Heart and Eartha Kitt singing Lazy afternoon. Both superb vocalists obviously, but I think these rank among their finest performances. Cole sang My Flaming Heart in the film Small Town Girl. The song was nominated for an 0scar in 1953 but lost out to Doris Day and Secret Love. The Nat King Cole Trio and the Nelson Riddle Orchestra accompany. Written by Albert Schubert, Barry Abbot and Ruby Toomb . Ruby was actually Rudolph Toombs, a prolific doo wop and R and B song writer. Lazy afternoon was written by John La Touche and Jerome Moross and was originally performed in the 1954 musical Golden Apple by Kay Ballad. Barbra Streisand covered it in the mid 70s. This song belongs to Eartha though. There is none of her characteristic playfulness here. This is languid, sensuous, serious and superb. Henri Rene provides silky, smooth orchestration. It certainly makes you yearn for a lazy afternoon. Enjoy, these are songs not just for valentines day after all. 

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published on February 14, 2021, by

FS58: Andy Iona to Ethel Smith, Freddy Mills & Wingy Manone

A couple from Forgotten Songs favourite Harry Parry and his Radio Rhythm Club Sextet- Black eyes and Blues for eight. Three from another regular, Harry Roy- They’re building another alley for Sally, There’s joy in your heart coming home and Sentimental interlude. Wingy Manone is back. Love this one armed, hot trumpeter and we even get his great vocals in Manone Blues. Also up Kay Starr, Joan Regan and Felix Mendelssohn- he’s accompanied by Roland Peachy on steel guitar. Humour, dated, from Clown Argo and Co and a comedy skit called a Gale in the night. Can find out nothing about them. Really quite bizarre is Alfi and Harry with The trouble with Harry. Its the conceit of Ross Bagdasarian, songwriter and producer at Liberty Records. Not out right funny but rather cool. Bagdasarian had a big hit with Witch Doctor under the name David Seville.  Freddy Mills, world champion boxer 1948-50, gives us a selection of singalong party songs. An all round celeb, films, TV and adverts, he was also a business man. He was found dead in his car in 1965. Verdict suicide, almost certainly murder. A much happier story is Ethel Smith, an amazingly good organist, who lived to 93. She gives us her biggest hit, Tico, Tico. Next a real oddity on a hand written MSS record label. They were the company that supplied record pressing equipment. What’s the story behind this metal 78 of Get ready, get set, jump. Was it a sly pressing for a friend? A sample? Andy Iona, sounds Scottish but he was Hawaiian. Composer, writer and played steel guitar and saxophone. From him- Indebted to you. Lovely vocals on this track. A bonus record too, Charlie Barnet. Stay safe, stay positive. 

   

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published on February 10, 2021, by

FS57: Hindustani, Hawaiian, Italian and a wee bit of Scottish.

Blues upstairs and downstairs, from Nat Gonella, starts us off. Two Scottish numbers from Greenock male voice choir, with Loch Lomond and William Hannah with Caledonian circle. Hannah was a leading pre war accordionist and lived about 20 miles away from the Forgotten Songs studio in West Lothian. Also up The Avenue Tango Band with the rather tame, The golden tango girl,  Anton Walbrook, Benjamino Gigli, Carrol Gibbons and Benny Goodman, vocals by Helen Forrest. Three budget records: The Bluejays- Louise, Roland Blair- I cover the waterfront and, on a six inch The Victory label, The waters of kilarney. Frank Ferera is back with his wife Louise Greenus, Hawaiian Guitar duet. Early jazz from The  Happy six. Mr Sydney Coltham gives us a very refined song, which I think is pre 1920. Satya Chowdhury was born in Bengal, India and was very popular in the 1940s. Both starring and being a play back artist in many Indian films. Excellent track from Irish born Phil Green and his Basin Street band. He was long time arranger and conductor for Decca recorders.  What’s that hammering? Ted Heath and Blacksmith Blues, vocals by Lita Rosa. Stay safe, stay positive.   

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published on February 3, 2021, by

FS56: Pennies from Heaven- a musical tribute to the TV series.

Dennis Potter’s seminal TV 1978 drama was choc full of great music and songs from the 1930s, largely from British dance bands and orchestras. Bob Hoskins, Cheryl Campbell and Gemma Craven starred and did a great job of lip syncing to the likes of Al Bowlly, Roy Fox , Lew Stone, Bert Ambrose, Arthur Tracey, Maurice Winnick, Jack Paine, Jack Hylton, Billy Cotton and Henry Hall. They all feature in this episode, as does George Hall, with Roll along Prairie Moon  and Flannigan and Allen with Shine on harvest moon. Other songs are Goodnight Vienna, We’ll all go riding on a rainbow, Wednesday night hop, Stage coach, Man of my dreams, Home of the range, The waltz you saved for me, In the valley of the moon, Night and day, Life is empty without love, My Wild Oat, Its only a paper moon, Moon over Miami and You rascal you.  

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published on January 27, 2021, by

FS 55: The fabulous 1950s: Eve Boswell to Jack Scott and Jill Day

Even by the 1950s 78s were beginning see their dominance fade in the record market. Vinyl 33s and 45s was here. This though is a celebration of 50s shellac. To start we have the other side of the cracked Hot Lips Page, Randy Hall record from FS54, I tin whistle you. Earl Grant with Hunky dunky doo. Pianist, organist and singer. Sadly he died young at 39 in 1970. Lys Assia, Swiss winner of Euro vision in 1956, sings O Mein Papa. Also Eddy Arnold, Alma Cogan, Charlie Gracie, Fat Domino, Lonnie Donegan and Winifred Atwell.  Delighted to have Rose Murphy back, the Chee, Chee Girl. Surely one of  the most unusually voices of the 50s. Rose Brennan is back too, singing, as she did for many years, with Joe Loss. I think female singers and artist were really came to the fore in the 50s.  Hungarian born Eve Boswell gives us, Where you are. Love the fact that she started in the entertainment world in a family juggling act. Jill Day was hugely popular in this decade with her own TV show. She sings: Give her my love when you see her. Jim Dale, Actor, song writer, director, composer and star of a few Carry on films gives us a perfect piece of 50s pop in Be my girl. In amongst it all is Jack Scott, Canada’s greatest Rock and Roll artist.  Two belter from him, Leroy and My True Love. Stay safe

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published on January 20, 2021, by

FS54: Hot Lips Page to Charlie Barnet and Maggie Teyte.

Okay he’s a favourite, so its four from Harry Parry, Angry, Lonesome Road, I never knew(vocals: Primrose Hayes, can’t find anything out about this woman) and Pontiac jump. We start though with Hot Lips Page and Randy Halls and the Tin fluters. Not on his hot trumpet but brilliant vocals. Much sadness, this record is cracked! Fantastic combination of Joe Sullivan(pictured) and Big Joe Turner next and the brilliantly titled: Low down, dirty shame blues.  I have a real soft spot for the unjustly neglected Joe Sullivan. He returns with the flip side, I can’t give you anything but my love. Also up Harry Roy and Marjorie Kingsley, Roberto Inglez and Nat King Cole.  Another return to FS is Charlie Barnett. Wonderful, joyous fare, Ebony Rhapsody and I like to Riff. A decent copy of the magnificent Munson Street Breakdown has turned up, Utter brilliance from Lionel Hampton. We end with a 1950s song from the Tanner Sisters and a little bit of Culture from Maggie Teyte. She sees out with with Plassir d’amour.   

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published on January 13, 2021, by

FS 53: Arthur Godfrey to Carroll Gibbons and Anne Lenner

Lets bring the joy to a cold Edinburgh day. Eartha Kitt, Bob Skyles, Harry Roy and the McCravy brothers start us off. James and Frank McCravy are in a particularly joyous mood with Ring them heavenly bells. Brilliant close harmonies, fiddle and banjo. Two from Carroll Gibbons and his Savoy Orpheans. Vocals are provided by Anne Lenner and Lesley Douglas and Edna Kaye.  One from Geraldo- All of me, The Rhythm Kings- The girl in the little green hat, The Rhythm Maniacs- Baby, oh, Where can you be.  Arthur Godfrey was a massive star in the US on TV and radio in 1950s. He was a troubled, complex character whose ‘folksy’ image didn’t really stand up to scrutiny. That said If I were on a desert island with you is a fun song. We have four records from budget labels. I keep referring to them as eight inch but two are nine inch. Confusing. Well of course the idea was to get the same length of recording on to a smaller record and charge less. We have on the Broadcast label, The Midnight Merry makers- Louise, The Radio Melody Boys- There’s happiness ahead(Edison- Bell Radio label. On Woolworths own Crown 9in record, Rossinni’s Accordion Band- How much do I miss you and The Radio Serenaders- Lovely to look at. An awful lots of these records had Harry Bidgood behind them. The penultimate record is Felix Mendlessohn, no not that one, the one who had Hawaiian Serenaders. Stay safe, stay positive.    

   

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published on January 6, 2021, by

Hogmanay 2020 special. Coorie in and pour yourself a dram.

What a strange year its been. Lets forget about it and party. Here to help us is: Jimmy Shand- Blue Bell Polka, Ian Macpherson- My Ain Folk, Kenneth McKellar- Ae Fond Kiss, The Logan Family- A new year’s sing song, Tom Wright- McGinty’s Meal and Ale(Part 2), and from 1910, P.A Hope with Auld Lang Syne. Here’s tae us..  You’ll be hearing from me again in 2021. A happy and healthy one to you all.

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published on December 31, 2020, by

FS52: Warm music- Perry Como to Hal McIntyre via Eartha Kitt.

Sort of a Christmas special but not really. Just warm, comforting and fun music. We hear from Fats Domino  La, La, Tommy Dorsey- I’m getting sentimental over you, Harry Parry and his Radio Rhythm Club Sextet- Dim Blues, Nat King Cole- My Flaming Heart, Eartha Kitt- African Lullaby, Perry Como- Magic Moments, Flanagan and Allen- Sending out an SOS for you and Hometown, John Kirkby- Only a paper moon, Harry Parry with vocals by Doreen Villiers- Don’t be that way and Bounce me brother me a solid four, Mel Torme- Mountain Greenery and Hal McIntyre and South Bayou Shuffle.  Stay safe and have fun.

P.S Coorie is Scots for cuddle.

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published on December 25, 2020, by

FS51; Big voices, Frankie Laine to Kay Starr via Johnny Ray

Three artists whose voices were precursors to Rock and Roll.  Four from old Leather lungs or steel tonsils himself, Frankie Laine. Jealousy, That’s my desire,  Tarriers song and Blowing wild.  Laine had a career spanning an astonishing 75 years. He successfully sang in so many genres of music and was a man with a keen sense of social justice. His good friend Kay Starr provides two tracks: Wheel of Fortune and I’ll always be in love with you. Born on a reservation in Oklahoma in 1922 her heritage was very much native American.  She was singing on the radio at the age of 10. She’s become a firm favourite of Forgotten Songs. Someone new to FS, Johnny Ray. Another highly distinctive voice. Ray was highly popular throughout the 1950s and although dropped by his US record label in 1960 his career successfully continued in Britain and Australia. He gives us: The only girl I’ll ever loved and In the Candlelight.  Quite restrained performances from this often dramatic performer. Patti Page, another friend of Frankie Laine sings Sentimental music. We move away from the 1950s with two delightful tracks from the 20s Frank Ferera and John Paaluhi, Hawaiian Mother of mine and The London Accordion Band with It was a Tango. Lulu Zeiglar and Vido Musso give us another change of direction. We finish with the magnificent voice of Paul Robeson:  Just a wearin’ for you and Eriskay love lilt. His bass baritone resonates with emotional in these wistful songs.  A lovely but slightly melancholic end to to FS51 

    

 

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published on December 18, 2020, by