Author Archives for Miles

FS54: Hot Lips Page to Charlie Barnet and Maggie Teyte.

Okay he’s a favourite, so its four from Harry Parry, Angry, Lonesome Road, I never knew(vocals: Primrose Hayes, can’t find anything out about this woman) and Pontiac jump. We start though with Hot Lips Page and Randy Halls and the Tin fluters. Not on his hot trumpet but brilliant vocals. Much sadness, this record is cracked! Fantastic combination of Joe Sullivan(pictured) and Big Joe Turner next and the brilliantly titled: Low down, dirty shame blues.  I have a real soft spot for the unjustly neglected Joe Sullivan. He returns with the flip side, I can’t give you anything but my love. Also up Harry Roy and Marjorie Kingsley, Roberto Inglez and Nat King Cole.  Another return to FS is Charlie Barnett. Wonderful, joyous fare, Ebony Rhapsody and I like to Riff. A decent copy of the magnificent Munson Street Breakdown has turned up, Utter brilliance from Lionel Hampton. We end with a 1950s song from the Tanner Sisters and a little bit of Culture from Maggie Teyte. She sees out with with Plassir d’amour.   

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published on January 13, 2021, by

FS 53: Arthur Godfrey to Carroll Gibbons and Anne Lenner

Lets bring the joy to a cold Edinburgh day. Eartha Kitt, Bob Skyles, Harry Roy and the McCravy brothers start us off. James and Frank McCravy are in a particularly joyous mood with Ring them heavenly bells. Brilliant close harmonies, fiddle and banjo. Two from Carroll Gibbons and his Savoy Orpheans. Vocals are provided by Anne Lenner and Lesley Douglas and Edna Kaye.  One from Geraldo- All of me, The Rhythm Kings- The girl in the little green hat, The Rhythm Maniacs- Baby, oh, Where can you be.  Arthur Godfrey was a massive star in the US on TV and radio in 1950s. He was a troubled, complex character whose ‘folksy’ image didn’t really stand up to scrutiny. That said If I were on a desert island with you is a fun song. We have four records from budget labels. I keep referring to them as eight inch but two are nine inch. Confusing. Well of course the idea was to get the same length of recording on to a smaller record and charge less. We have on the Broadcast label, The Midnight Merry makers- Louise, The Radio Melody Boys- There’s happiness ahead(Edison- Bell Radio label. On Woolworths own Crown 9in record, Rossinni’s Accordion Band- How much do I miss you and The Radio Serenaders- Lovely to look at. An awful lots of these records had Harry Bidgood behind them. The penultimate record is Felix Mendlessohn, no not that one, the one who had Hawaiian Serenaders. Stay safe, stay positive.    

   

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published on January 6, 2021, by

Hogmanay 2020 special. Coorie in and pour yourself a dram.

What a strange year its been. Lets forget about it and party. Here to help us is: Jimmy Shand- Blue Bell Polka, Ian Macpherson- My Ain Folk, Kenneth McKellar- Ae Fond Kiss, The Logan Family- A new year’s sing song, Tom Wright- McGinty’s Meal and Ale(Part 2), and from 1910, P.A Hope with Auld Lang Syne. Here’s tae us..  You’ll be hearing from me again in 2021. A happy and healthy one to you all.

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published on December 31, 2020, by

FS52: Warm music- Perry Como to Hal McIntyre via Eartha Kitt.

Sort of a Christmas special but not really. Just warm, comforting and fun music. We hear from Fats Domino  La, La, Tommy Dorsey- I’m getting sentimental over you, Harry Parry and his Radio Rhythm Club Sextet- Dim Blues, Nat King Cole- My Flaming Heart, Eartha Kitt- African Lullaby, Perry Como- Magic Moments, Flanagan and Allen- Sending out an SOS for you and Hometown, John Kirkby- Only a paper moon, Harry Parry with vocals by Doreen Villiers- Don’t be that way and Bounce me brother me a solid four, Mel Torme- Mountain Greenery and Hal McIntyre and South Bayou Shuffle.  Stay safe and have fun.

P.S Coorie is Scots for cuddle.

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published on December 25, 2020, by

FS51; Big voices, Frankie Laine to Kay Starr via Johnny Ray

Three artists whose voices were precursors to Rock and Roll.  Four from old Leather lungs or steel tonsils himself, Frankie Laine. Jealousy, That’s my desire,  Tarriers song and Blowing wild.  Laine had a career spanning an astonishing 75 years. He successfully sang in so many genres of music and was a man with a keen sense of social justice. His good friend Kay Starr provides two tracks: Wheel of Fortune and I’ll always be in love with you. Born on a reservation in Oklahoma in 1922 her heritage was very much native American.  She was singing on the radio at the age of 10. She’s become a firm favourite of Forgotten Songs. Someone new to FS, Johnny Ray. Another highly distinctive voice. Ray was highly popular throughout the 1950s and although dropped by his US record label in 1960 his career successfully continued in Britain and Australia. He gives us: The only girl I’ll ever loved and In the Candlelight.  Quite restrained performances from this often dramatic performer. Patti Page, another friend of Frankie Laine sings Sentimental music. We move away from the 1950s with two delightful tracks from the 20s Frank Ferera and John Paaluhi, Hawaiian Mother of mine and The London Accordion Band with It was a Tango. Lulu Zeiglar and Vido Musso give us another change of direction. We finish with the magnificent voice of Paul Robeson:  Just a wearin’ for you and Eriskay love lilt. His bass baritone resonates with emotional in these wistful songs.  A lovely but slightly melancholic end to to FS51 

    

 

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published on December 18, 2020, by